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Academic, education & animal welfare speakers

Academic, education & animal welfare

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Ngaio is Associate Professor in Applied Ethology and Animal Welfare Science and Co-Director of the Massey University Animal Welfare Science and Bioethics Centre in the School of Veterinary Science. Her research employs behavioural and physiological methods to investigate various aspects of animal welfare in both domestic and wild animal species. Her major research themes include: systematic scientific evaluation of animal welfare; breathlessness in animals; humane methods of ‘euthanasia’ and slaughter; developmental processes, recognition, modulation and alleviation of pain in farm animals; humane vertebrate pest control; and welfare impacts associated with wildlife conservation activities.

Joe is a graduate of University College Dublin and has been a veterinarian for more than 30 years. He spent the first 20 years as an equine clinician, mainly in private practice but with an equine residency at Cambridge University in the middle. Joe completed two RCVS clinical certificates and thought he knew it all! A PhD in equine welfare, supported by World Horse Welfare, following by a research project and employment with The Donkey Sanctuary opened his eyes to how little true regard he had sometimes given to the sentience and welfare of the equines under his care, and he winces to recall how ignorant he had been when treating donkeys in particular. Joe will illustrate the importance for welfare NGOs to listen to the true needs and experiences of equines and how vital it is to keep these at the heart of what vets do; and how we can use a novel tool to assess donkey welfare and the impact of the work we do. He will encourage and assist colleagues to treat donkeys as the species they are. By highlighting their key differences - behaviour, physiology, nutrition, medication and anatomy he’ll show how approaches must differ from those used with their larger relatives. Pulling from his years of experience in equine clinical practice and welfare organisations in Europe, Asia, Africa and Central America, Joe will add insights as to how vets should better assess quality-of-life and make end-of-life decisions that are both principled and pragmatic.

An impulse call to a horse welfare charity got Chris started in overseas training in 2000, seven years with them led to an opportunity to join The Donkey Sanctuary in 2007. Chris has been attached to the Donkey Sanctuary since that time and is currently Lead harness for the Research and Operational Support Team a Donkey Sanctuary department. Chris started to construct ‘modules’ on harness making and related topics in 2014, and over the last few years that has taken precedence, with the ultimate goal of being able to offer a package to suit the needs of working donkeys, available for download from The Donkey Sanctuary website. With internet access so widespread this is seen as the new face of training, it can also be backed up by a visit and hands on training for groups as requested. Other work underway at present is the first scientific trialling of collars specifically for donkeys, based in Spain and Portugal. Chris’s specific interest in these trials is to identify a simple to construct and maintain collar, to replace the usual breast collar used in many countries where full neck collar production is not possible. In addition to the scientific trials being run Chris also makes experimental collars and works with them using the New Zealand Ponui donkeys at a rare breeds farm in Taranaki.

Speaker bio to come.

Tēnā koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki a Aotearoa. Ko Eloise Jillings tōku ingoa. Welcome to Aotearoa New Zealand. Eloise is Māori (indigenous people of New Zealand) through her mother and Canadian through her father and has been fortunate to have lived in both countries. Her current roles at Massey University School of Veterinary Science (New Zealand) are Associate Dean – Admission and Students, and senior lecturer in clinical pathology. She is looking forward to sharing her research interests around veterinary education, with particular focus on veterinary student selection, and diversity and indigeneity in the veterinary profession with everyone.

Kat is a small animal veterinarian in the Animal Welfare Science and Bioethics Centre (School of Veterinary Science, Massey University). Her PhD research focuses on the veterinarian’s role in end-of-life (EoL) management of older and chronically ill cats in New Zealand. This research focuses on understanding how veterinary students are taught EoL management in Australasian veterinary schools, as well as how EoL management is enacted by veterinarians in practice. Kat is also a lecturer in Animal Welfare and teaches undergraduate and postgraduate veterinary and animal scientists animal welfare, behaviour, ethics, and law (relating to animals). She is a member of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (ANZCVS) Animal Welfare Chapter and is studying towards a fellowship in animal welfare science, ethics, and law. Kat is passionate about enhancing veterinarians’ understanding, and enactment of their role as animal welfare experts. Her research interests include: Animal welfare, animal behaviour, veterinary ethics, animal euthanasia, end-of-life decision-making for animals, companion animals, owner-vet relationships, human-animal relationships, knowledge transfer, human behaviour change for animals, qualitative research methods, and veterinary education.

Tēnā koutou katoa. Nau mai haere mai ki a Aotearoa. Ko Eloise Jillings tōku ingoa. Welcome to Aotearoa New Zealand. Eloise is Māori (indigenous people of New Zealand) through her mother and Canadian through her father and has been fortunate to have lived in both countries. Her current roles at Massey University School of Veterinary Science (New Zealand) are Associate Dean – Admission and Students, and senior lecturer in clinical pathology. She is looking forward to sharing her research interests around veterinary education, with particular focus on veterinary student selection, and diversity and indigeneity in the veterinary profession with everyone.

Speaker bio to come.

Speaker bio to come.

Speaker bio to come.

Speaker bio to come.

Speaker bio to come.

Speaker bio to come.

Speaker bio to come.

Speaker bio to come.